Monthly Archives: March 2013

Antique Buffet Turned Media Cabinet

20130321-223545.jpgAhhh, I’m so thrilled to be done with this project! Yes, I am in love with the final result, but, WOW, what a lot of work this refinish was! I had been scouring Craig’s List for months trying to find the perfect sideboard to turn into an entertainment center & then there it was… a thirty dollar, heavier than heck, paint-speckled, mammoth piece of furniture crafted by the Mount Airy Mantel and Table Co. Inc…. I snagged it up in a heartbeat & I was excited about the future splinters it would give me. I had originally planned on painting & distressing the base an antique white and refinishing the top in an ebony stain, but like most projects, once I start working on them, they have something else in mind! The wood underneath the icky orange stain and black paint speckle was so gorgeous that I just had to put myself through the misery of sanding the ENTIRE exterior of the piece down to bare wood! It took over two weeks of stripping and sanding, but the results were worth it. I conditioned the wood and stained it ebony, then red mahogany, to give it a depth and hint of burgundy. While the stain dried, I primed and painted the interior a fresh, spring green, finishing up with a polycrylic topcoat since there would be warm electronics inside. Once the stain was dry, I sprayed on a coat of satin polyurethane so that when I used the rub-on poly, the stain wouldn’t come off. The finish looks like bare wood, but gives the piece a warm sheen & protection from my toddlers.

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buffetprogressTurning the buffet into a unit for storing entertainment equipment was the easy part. I took out the staples and pried the backing off & cut two rectangular holes smaller than the width of our DVR and blu ray player where the cords could be fed through. In order for the remotes to work I left the panels out of the middle two doors (still hunting for the perfect aged glass to have cut for the center insets), and painted the inset panels of the outer doors to make the beautiful carvings pop & accentuate the piece’s symmetry. Voila, it is now a media cabinet! If I would’ve started a swear jar at the beginning of this project, I’d have enough quarters to buy my next furniture refinishing project, lol! In the end, all the splinters were worth the result… having a piece of furniture in your home that you poured your heart and soul into that will someday be passed down through generations is the epitome of joy!

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Now I’m off to find the perfect glass insets for the center doors! Happy DIY’ing weekend to y’all!!

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Workbench / Outfeed Table of my Dreams

woodbenchtop It feels so good to have a proper place to ponder current projects! My workbench/outfeed table is finished and I couldn’t be happier with it! I made most of the base from a plan I saw on ana-white.com, a simple & sturdy workbench, but I wanted to add an inspiring top. I had 2 pallets of gorgeous oak in my workshop, so I started brainstorming… I was making this workbench because I needed the storage & I also needed a long table to push stock out of my table saw. This got me excited about soon refacing my kitchen cabinets, creating the Shaker style fronts on the table saw is a project I’ve daydreamed about for a while now, so I saved up for a Magswitch featherboard for said table saw in order to cut the rails and stiles safely… long story short, my newly acquired featherboard inspired the herringbone-pattern of my tabletop! It has an easy construction to it, but took forever to put together!! Taking apart the oak palettes is a ton of work in itself since each board, which made just one piece of my top’s puzzle, has 6 nails that I had to pry and hammer out. Once apart, I cut each end of each piece at a 45 degree angle, size of which was cut to match a template board previously made from drawing a center line down the middle of the plywood top. I needed to buy a few pieces of poplar, the green complimenting the pink oak extremely well!

outfeed workI used some scrap plywood for the top and shelf, the bottom shelf to be used as storage. I painted it in a white & mint green faux bois pattern (false wood) to match a previously painted focus wall in the room. Can ya tell I’m a wood lover?! My top was 24″ x 51″ and I wanted a two-inch overhang on each side, so I had the scrap piece of sturdy 19/32″ pine plywood cut to 28″ x 55″. This would be the piece that all the other pieces would be glued and brad nailed to. Once all the pieces are cut with the same 45 degree angle at each end, I layed them out like a puzzle on the top, sanded, glued, and nailed. I wanted the finish of this piece to stand up to dings & be somewhat slick so that boards from my table saw would glide down it. Epoxy fit the bill and is an easy finish to apply, well, easy compared to lacquer & poly. You just mix, stir, and pour on your table top… I added tape around the edges so that gravity could do it’s work and fill it. I used 2 coats of Rustoleum Super Glaze Epoxy which I picked up from Home Depot and the results are great as long as you follow the directions perfectly. After it dried for over 12 hours, I removed the tape and added a 1 x 2 frame around the edge. I couldn’t be more in love with it! The herringbone patterned wood on top looks incredible! So that’s about it… now I have an outfeed table so I can get back to daydreaming about my Shaker cabinets!

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Drab to Fab Thrift Store Table Refinish

Hey y’all! I wanted to share my most recent refinished furniture project. I found this damsel in distress for just $5 at a thrift store and fell in love with it’s octagonal shape. Here’s the step-by-step…

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I distressed the bottom which was a dirty shade of yellowish green and it happened to have white underneath (probably primer), which looked like an antique white so it worked beautifully over the bare wood. My distressing technique is to dip 0000 steel wool into wax and work off some of the paint. When I’m happy with the way it looks, I take an old shirt and buff out the wax until it’s smooth. I love furniture wax… it has a warm glow to it and feels so soft to the touch!

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Next up was the top which required tons of sanding. Sanding is probably my least favorite aspect of refinishing furniture, but it’s a must in order to put a beautiful new stain & finish on. After sanding with 80, 120, then 220 grit sandpaper, I tack clothed the top, conditioned the wood, and stained the outer edge in an ebony stain… the center took a bit more time since I wanted it to look aged. I mixed a natural stain with a little ebony and a lot of elbow grease. With the color just how I wanted I polyed it, this time I used a rub-on polyurethane just to try something new… I like the way it looks, warm just like the wax… time will tell how toddler-proof it is.

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I love how this project turned out… now I just have to muster up the courage to put a price tag on it! Happy DIY’ing weekend to y’all!

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